AN fittings, braided lines, etc.

wmseverin

New member
Hey y'all,

As I struggle to get everything mated up on the ex-Dave Brown car to all my crap, I'm curious to know when all the AN fittings and braided lines made their way into sportscar racing? I realize their origin was WWII aircraft... but when did they become common in production car racing? What was the timeframe? (I live an hour to two hours away from any reliable source of AN fittings up here in the frozen tundra, and it's made putting it all together a challenge... Fleet Farm is woefully lacking in what I need...)

WST
 

JFW

New member
Mr. Thicko said:
Hey y'all,

As I struggle to get everything mated up on the ex-Dave Brown car to all my crap, I'm curious to know when all the AN fittings and braided lines made their way into sportscar racing? I realize their origin was WWII aircraft... but when did they become common in production car racing? What was the timeframe? (I live an hour to two hours away from any reliable source of AN fittings up here in the frozen tundra, and it's made putting it all together a challenge... Fleet Farm is woefully lacking in what I need...)

WST
AN fittings (Aeroquip) first started appearing on race cars in the early sixties on pro-level cars. By 1970, they were becoming common on top level SCCA production cars.

At this time, the only source was through aircraft equipment supply sources. I remember ordering Aeroquip from the FBO at the local airport. The selection was limited at best.

By the early 80's several companies such as Earl's and Russell began providing a wider range of fittings and hoses to the performance automotive market.
 

wmseverin

New member
I've seen up close and personal as well as in photographs, many Works Healeys and don't recall seeing much of it... but of course those were 50's and 60's timeframe cars.

I don't have any issue with the function, etc., but apparently you can now get black ends, rather than the gaudy blue & red that belongs on a rice rocket in a Pep Boys parking lot? (Just effin' with ya Dave.. I'll have that car looking as trashy as the rest of my stuff soon enough, with or without AN fittings).
 

JFW

New member
Mr. Thicko said:
I've seen up close and personal as well as in photographs, many Works Healeys and don't recall seeing much of it... but of course those were 50's and 60's timeframe cars.

I don't have any issue with the function, etc., but apparently you can now get black ends, rather than the gaudy blue & red that belongs on a rice rocket in a Pep Boys parking lot? (Just effin' with ya Dave.. I'll have that car looking as trashy as the rest of my stuff soon enough, with or without AN fittings).
You can paint the red/blue fittings with cast grey and they look fine.

You can also buff off the colors but that can be quite time consuming.

I agree that they don't look very authentic on fifties and early sixties cars.

BTW, the Aeroquip fittings of that period were natural metal or clear anodized. I don't think the red/blue stuff came along until Earl's started it, circa 1980.
 

Dougie

New member
Mr. Thicko said:
Hey y'all,

As I struggle to get everything mated up on the ex-Dave Brown car to all my crap, I'm curious to know when all the AN fittings and braided lines made their way into sportscar racing? I realize their origin was WWII aircraft... but when did they become common in production car racing? What was the timeframe? (I live an hour to two hours away from any reliable source of AN fittings up here in the frozen tundra, and it's made putting it all together a challenge... Fleet Farm is woefully lacking in what I need...)

WST
If you use stainless and aluminum fittings you can create a pretty authenic looking period race
engine bay.

Attached files /converted_files/uploads/804.jpg
 
You think AN is hard to find, it isn't, it's allover the net, try finding the BSP fittings you would need to be more stockish, it would be a freaking nightmare. Move your mind away from driving to get it, and wrap your mind around the idea of mail order which means you plan ahead, think of it like chess Wm. It became popular because it offered new solutions, most Brit cars for example send unfiltered oil to the oil cooler, not a wise choice, so AN lines/fitting and a remote oil filter housing offer up way to not do that. These days I mostly use push-lock hose and fittings under the hood, I hated cutting my hands on the braided hose liner of SS hose, which is still rubber with a SS braided wrap, but it is required inside the cockpit, like for a fuel line, or accusump hose. So I use braided only where I have to.
 

onthegrid

Member
Yes to push-lock.

Many folks use braided steel covering BUT they are thinking that it never will have to be replaced. It do have a finite life...the rubber inner hose degrades. probably 4 years and in using for fuel it might be much less. Add to the equation that it might be less if its off shore manufactured.
 

fordboy628

Moderator
Staff member
WST, et all,

BSP hose ends, black textile reinforced hydraulic hose, BSP fittings, Oetiker clamps, etc, are all readily available from Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies (slightly south of your frozen tundra location, but still above the "cheddar curtain" . . . .), as well as other suppliers. Dave Bean Engineering in California, and QED or Burton in the UK come to mind. This would allow you to plumb your engine compartment in the way you wish, to avoid the red and blue aeroplane look . . . . . . .

Not certain which way might be more affordable, Aeroquip might have the edge though. But you knew racing wasn't cheap, right?

BTW, I use Oetiker type clamps even with "push to lock" type hose ends and hose. Yeah, I've been around long enough to be paranoid . . . . .

AND, as pointed out above, hydraulic hoses require periodic replacement for the reasons stated.

Cheers
 
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